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Yle aims to recruit top talent from the technology and creative sectors and will join forces with Aalto University to expand their cooperation

Yle and Aalto University have reached an agreement on communicating about jobs, traineeships and exciting career paths for the students of Aalto. The Employer Services Key Customer Package will be valid for one year as a first step. 
YLE-yhteistyö
Yle and Aalto University have cooperated extensively in the fields of research and education through, for instance, the MeMAD project, which focuses on AI and automatic audiovisual content.

Aalto University trains experts in the fields of art and technology, both of which are important sectors for Yle. Study verticals that are of particular interest to Yle include computer science, data science, visual communication design, as well as TV and movie production.

The cooperation will start with Yle attending the first Aalto Talent Expo on 31 October. However, Yle will also arrange its own recruitment event on campus.

“Aalto is an important partner for us, and we want to reinforce the partnership with systematic cooperation and communication, especially to students in the fields of importance to Yle. The new partnership model will boost the renewal of the company and offer fresh perspectives,” says Gunilla Ohls, Director, HR, Communications and Strategy at Yle.

“Aalto is well-known, and a good partner for us and by increasing our visibility on campus and interaction with the students, we can ensure that the best talent will want to work for us also in the future,” says Janne Yli-Äyhö, Yle’s Chief Operations Officer, who is responsible for production and technology.

“We want to create varied forms of cooperation and services that deepen our partnerships and collaboration and sharing of expertise allow us to create new opportunities, and learn from each other. Developing our cooperation with Yle in the field of employment is important because Yle is a significant recruiter of Aalto’s students and alumni,” says Teppo Heiskanen, Director for Advancement and Corporate Engagement at Aalto University.

Yle and Aalto have cooperated extensively in the fields of research and education through, for instance, the MeMAD project, which focuses on AI and automatic audiovisual content, and the Visualizing Knowledge conference on information design.

 

Further information:

Riitta Kontio
Manager, Career Services, Advancement and Corporate Engagement
Aalto University [email protected]
tel. +358 50 550 2066

Saija Uski
HR expert, HR Services, Yle
[email protected]
tel. +358 40 505 9747

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