The university surveys the career pathways of its graduated students

The results will help the university to develop its teaching and will also affect its funding. This time, we ask master's graduates from year 2014 and doctoral graduates from 2016 to participate.
Kaksi mies- ja yksi naisopiskelija seisoo Väre-rakennuksen edessä. Miehillä on polkupyörät.

Universities closely follow how their teaching and how the degrees they grant meet the changing competence needs of the working life. The Aarresaari network, formed by the career and recruitment services of all the universities in Finland, organises an annual survey targeting master’s and doctoral graduates. The invitation to participate in this year’s survey will be sent to those who graduated from the university in 2014 with a master's degree and to the doctors who graduated in 2016.

Petri Suomala, Vice President of Aalto University, invites all students who graduated in these years to respond: ’We hope that you will participate in large numbers. We will obtain valuable and topical information from you which will also help us to plan for the best possible teaching for the future student classes.’

Aalto University will also benefit financially from a large number of responses as, regarding master’s graduates, responses constitute one of the grounds for the financing granted by the Ministry of Education and Culture.

Master’s graduates find their degrees are valued by employers

In 2018, 87% of the masters who responded to a corresponding survey were satisfied with their degree in terms of their career. 85% agreed that the skills and knowledge they learned could be applied well in their current job and 90% would recommend their degree to others. As many as 93% of master's graduates from Aalto University agreed with the statement ‘The degree is valued by employers’.

Based on the results, Aalto university graduates identified an ability to learn and absorb new things, self-direction, problem-solving and co-operative skills as the most important skills that they needed at work and developed at university.

Nine doctors out of ten are satisfied with their degree in terms of their career

Of the 2015 doctoral graduates more than half had found employment at companies, one fifth at a university and less than one tenth as an entrepreneur or freelancer. A total of 66% of the respondents feel that their duties have become more demanding and interesting after they had attained their degree. 89% of them were satisfied in terms of their career.

Aalto University sends a career monitoring survey to all masters who graduated in 2014 and to all doctors from year 2016 by email, SMS or mail. Responses to the survey can be submitted until 30 November.

 

Read more:
Aalto University graduates in working lifeAalto University doctors in working life

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

Students participating in the 2040+Helsinki=? event held in Väre building. Photos: Valtteri Heinilä, Aino Vaarno
Studies Published:

Helsinki 2040: the future is full of hope!

Some 50 Aalto students from arts, technology and business backgrounds presented a promising vision for Helsinki in year 2040.
Shimmering Wood-based Structural Colour by Noora Yau. Photo Eeva Suorlahti
Cooperation, Research & Art, Studies Published:

Aalto University presents six concepts on renewable biomaterials at Dutch Design Week

CHEMARTS exhibition showcases fascinating recyclable prototypes which are toxic-free, recyclable and don't release micro-plastics.
Professor Ray Sterling
Research & Art, Studies Published:

Professor Ray Sterling: Worldwide developments in urban underground planning

Watch the video recording of Professor Sterling's lecture.
Iiris Sundin katselee taivaalle Laajalahden lintutornilla
Cooperation, Research & Art, Studies Published:

When physician and AI work together, the patient benefits

Doctoral student Iiris Sundin learned in her studies that a machine learning model could make use of a physician's silent knowledge which usually is never written down. This kind of model predicts best how a given patient will react to specific treatment.