News

Measurement method separates shaft runout components

Rotating devices are used in numerous applications. A research project looked into why some new rotors machined for electrical devices do not reach industry standards for shaft runout.
Rotor
The roundness of an electric motor's axle is measured with a multi-sensor method inside the ARotor laboratory at Aalto University.

Aalto University and ABB collaborated in the Rotoround project to study how roundness aberrations and electrical runout affect the total indicated runout measured in the machined axles of electrical devices.

'The aim is to minimise runout, or measured deviation from nominal dimensions, as the data on these deviations are used to monitor device condition and in diagnostics,' says Tuomas Tiainen, a doctoral student at the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

'In this study, we used a multi-sensor method that allowed us to define a roundness profile for the surface and bearing surface of an axle. By comparing the data we get from surface sensors with the simultaneous measurements from eddy current sensors allows us to define the so-called electrical runout, which means the repeating deviation caused by variations in material properties,' Tiainen explains.

Industrial standards define limits for surface runout in the roundness of axles used in electric motors, generators, pumps and more.

According to Tiainen, the study showed that faults in roundness and eddy current sensors can, in some cases, account for all of the allowed range of deviation. This has resulted in rotors being discarded for not meeting runout specifications.

'Our novel measurement and computing method can discern between the components that make up the runout and help find out why a rotor fails to meet the specified limits. At the same time it helps in targeting corrective actions,' Tiainen says.

'In a broader view, our research will help in building better rotating devices that rotate faster, operate with greater efficiency and require less maintenance.'

Further information

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Read more news

Sustainability Science day banneri
Research & Art Published:

How to accelerate innovations, ensure food sequrity and make cities green? Sustainability Science Days seeks answers to the huge sustainability challenges of our time

Sustainability Science Days 2022 focuses on global system-level solutions for food systems, cities, governance and more. Sustainability Science Days is Finland's largest two-day science conference on sustainable development, organized by Aalto University and the University of Helsinki.
Image Credit: Anne Kinnunen
Research & Art Published:

‘Painting Energies’ Podcast Explores Light and Energy at the Intersection of Art and Science

A new podcast hosted by physicist Janne Halme and artist Bartaku explores the connections between light and color, plant and microbe, art and science. The Painting Energies podcast builds upon their visionary artscience workings that have been evolving at Aalto University since 2017. Painting Energies is not to be missed for any scientist, artist or student looking to find new ways of combining art and science.
Festival poster
Research & Art Published:

Art for All festival returns in August

The cross-artistic festival will take place 26.-28.8.2022 in the Helsinki Botanical Garden. The event features pieces from performing arts to installations and audiovisual works.
A woman in white t-shirt and a man in red shirt standing and talking together
Research & Art, University Published:

New Academy Research Fellows and postdoctoral researchers

Funding granted by the Academy of Finland brings six new Academy Research Fellows, and 14 postdoctoral researchers to Aalto University – congratulations to all!