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Welcome, student groups, to a virtual neuroimaging laboratory tour

In the laboratory you can use a remote connection to learn about a lie detector and a thermal camera, for example. We welcome upper secondary school pupils, upper comprehensive school pupils, students from universities of applied sciences, and others.
Lämpökamerakuva, Aalto-yliopisto.
Thermal camera picture, Aalto University.

‘Interaction with the group is a significant part of the virtual visit.  We will answer questions, and during the visit there will also be a light-hearted lie detector test. However, the skin's electrical conductivity curve revealing a ‘lie’ will also react to many other things, such as laughter, holding the breath, and being startled’, says research engineer Veli-Matti Saarinen.

In the virtual laboratory eye movements are also monitored remotely, and thermal camera images are studied.

‘Visitors often ask how they might get work here’, Saarinen says.

“And there is also often competition over who gets to be tested’, adds research engineer Tuomas Tolvanen.

Since the spring, visits to Aalto NeuroImaging (ANI) brain imaging laboratories by groups of student groups have been cancelled because of the coronavirus. In addition to Saarinen and Tolvanen, ANI Director Veikko Jousmäki and Toni Auranen, Technical Director of the AMI (Advanced Magnetic Imaging) Centre now want to offer virtual visits to the facilities of the research infrastructure.

‘We want to welcome student groups from Aalto University courses and from upper secondary schools and upper comprehensive schools on a virtual tour to a brain research laboratory’, Veikko Jousmäki says.

Veli-Matti Saarinen vasemmalla ja Tuomas Tolvanen oikealla.
Veli-Matti Saarinen (left) ja Tuomas Tolvanen (right). Picture: Aalto University.

A visit to the virtual laboratory begins with an AMI Centre presentation video, describing MRI devices used in magnetic imaging, the studies that they are used for, and other related equipment. The visit continues in the Aalto Behavioural Laboratory (ABL), with a real-time virtual tour, including lie detection and thermal camera pictures.

The neuroimaging laboratories are in the Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering of Aalto University. The brain research laboratory has traditionally hosted many kinds of groups in addition to Aalto University students of neuroscience. Courses on upper secondary school psychology tests and optometry studies at a university of applied sciences are suitable subjects for a visit. Physics students and psychology teachers from upper comprehensive schools have also visited the brain research laboratory. A total of about 600 people have visited the laboratory each year.

Further information:

Aalto NeuroImaging (ANI) brain imaging laboratories

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