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Näytös18 displayed on live stream, Tekstiili18 exhibition open

Aalto University students’ fashion show and textile design exhibition are on display this weekend at the Cable Factory, Helsinki.
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Today on Friday at 9 p.m. there will be over twenty Aalto University students' collections presented on a catwalk in Merikaapelihalli at the Cable Factory. More than a thousand domestic and international guests are expected to see the fashion show. The event has attracted international attention in recent years, and the tickets were sold out on the first day.

It is possible to watch the event as a live stream on Aalto University School of Art, Design and Architecture Facebook page.

The Tekstiili18 exhibition by Aalto University textile design students is open in Turbiinisali at the Cable Factory until Sunday 27.5. The exhibition is open on Friday 25.5. also after the Näytös18 from 10 p.m. until midnight. The exhibition presents multidisciplinary approaches to textile design and co-operation with fashion, interior design and science.

There is also a 3D hologram created in collaboration by the Aalto University School of Engineering and a dance show projected in the showroom.

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Näytös18

Tekstiili18
 

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