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Jyri Hämäläinen appointed Dean of Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering

His five-year period as dean starts on 1 August 2015.
Professor Jyri Hämäläinen has been appointed Dean of Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering.

Professor Jyri Hämäläinen has been appointed Dean of Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering and as a member of the university's Management Team. His five-year period as dean starts on 1 August 2015.

Jyri Hämäläinen has previously worked as the Professor of the Department of Communications and Networking and as the vice dean responsible for teaching at the School of Electrical Engineering.

Hämäläinen studied, earned his doctorate and worked at the University of Oulu at the Department of Mathematics. He has a doctorate in Applied Mathematics (Ph.D.) and in Signal Processing for Communications (D.Sc. Tech). He defended his doctoral thesis on signal processing in communications in 2007 after working in the industrial field. In 2008, he was appointed as a fixed-term professor at the Helsinki University of Technology, and he was appointed as professor to the Aalto University tenure track career system in 2013. At Aalto University, Hämäläinen has focused his research on wireless networks.

– The School of Electrical Engineering is a fine academic community and a very competitive operator both nationally and internationally. I am very proud to serve this community, and I accept this task with a very positive outlook and great faith in the future, says Hämäläinen.

– Jyri Hämäläinen has experience in both business and academic fields, and he also has strong management competence from various roles.  I am glad that Jyri is joining us in developing the university, says President of Aalto University, Tuula Teeri.

The dean of the School of Electrical Engineering is responsible for directing the school’s activities in accordance with Aalto University’s strategy and taking part in the long-term development of the university as a member of its Management Team. The dean is responsible for the overall development and international competitiveness of the school, for allocating its resources within the framework of the university’s overall operating plan and budget, and for recruiting faculty in accordance with Aalto University’s tenure track policies.

Keijo Nikoskinen, temporary Dean of the School of Electrical Engineering, continues as the Professor of Electromagnetics and as the Vice Dean responsible for teaching.

A photo of Jyri Hämäläinen can be downloaded at the Aalto University material bank (materialbank.aalto.fi).

For more information:

President Tuula Teeri

tel. +358 50 512 4194 (assistant Harriet Jehkonen)
[email protected]
Aalto University

Professor Jyri Hämäläinen
tel. +358 50 3160 975
[email protected]
Aalto University
School of Electrical Engineering

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