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What does justice mean?

The public lecture series aims to encourage discussion on the state of justice in people's everyday thinking and in political decision making.

In autumn 2015, the top academics in Finland will illuminate their own discipline's concepts of justice.

– Everyone supports justice, but it means a different thing for everyone. Someone wants it to serve the economic growth, while another talks about helping the poor and the marginalised, describes professor of the School of Business Matti Häyry.

The lecture series is part of the Aalto University School of Business' project Justice and Its Alternatives in a Globalising World.

– In our project, we aim to create understanding for experts and decision-makers of how people see justice in very different ways, especially when discussing worldwide issues in the context of globalisation. This understanding then hopefully leads to better research on the subject and to better political decision making, describes the leader of the project, professor Häyry.

You are welcome to attend these high-quality, free public lectures

Time: autumn 2015, Wednesday evenings of every odd week, from 5 to 7 p.m.
Place: Aalto University School of Business (Main Building, Runeberginkatu 14-16, except on 21 October Chydenia Building, Runeberginkatu 22-24).

  • 9 September Justice in Christianity and Islam, docent Maijastina Kahlos and professor Jaakko Hämeen-Anttila
  • 23 September Justice in Ancient philosophy, professor Anneli Aejmelaeus and professor Simo Knuuttila
  • 7 October Justice as a juridical concept, professor Pia Letto-Vanamo and professor Juha Karhu
  • 21 October Justice as a philosophical concept, professor Kaisa Herne and professor Matti Häyry
  • 4 November Social justice, professor Juho Saari and professor Simo Vehmas
  • 18 November Justice in administration and management, professor Kevät Nousiainen and research professor Marianna Virtanen
  • 2 December Economy and global justice, professor Pertti Haaparanta and professor Minna Halme
  • 16 December This is not justice, panel discussion

The research project Justice and Its Alternatives in a Globalising World, led by professor Matti Häyry, is one of the three projects that received Argumenta funding in 2014. Argumenta is a funding model of the Finnish Cultural Foundation and not meant for actual research work, but intended to stimulate dialogue between researchers in different fields of science on significant current subjects of research.

More information:
Professor Matti Häyry, Aalto University School of Business
[email protected]

Coordinator Johanna Ahola-Launonen, Aalto University School of Business 
[email protected]
tel. +358 40 557 8382

http://management.aalto.fi/fi/disciplines/philosophy/research-philosophy/oiva/

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