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WarSampo won the Open Data Prize in the 2017 LODLAM Challenge

The WarSampo team was recognized for making cultural heritage material openly available in a linked open data project.
Eero Hyvönen (Aalto University and University of Helsinki) & Valentine Charles (Europeana)

WarSampo is a web portal with large data sets on World War II in Finland linked with the possibility to search, browse and visualize this data from different perspectives. The goal of the project is to provide a tool for understanding history and promoting peace. Members of the awarded team, headed by Professor Eero Hyvönen, are Erkki Heino, Esko Ikkala, Mikko Koho, Petri Leskinen, Eetu Mäkelä, Minna Tamper, and Jouni Tuominen.

LODLAM stands for “Linked Open Data in Libraries, Archives and Museums” and the fourth international conference was held in Venice, Italy, at the end of June 2017.

WarSampo homepages:  http://www.sotasampo.fi/en/

Further information:
Professor Eero Hyvönen
Tel. +358 50 384 1618
[email protected]

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