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University applicants increasingly interested in the field of technology

The number of applicants increased for almost every university of technology in Finland.

In the 2017 joint university application process, the total number of primary applicants for the field of technology increased by about 13% from the previous year. For Aalto University, the number of primary applicants for the field of technology increased by around 11%, for Lappeenranta University of Technology by around 7%, and for Tampere University of Technology by around 23%.

‘We are very delighted by this increase in applicants for the field of technology. Finnish universities of technology have worked hard to maintain the attractiveness of the field, and this work must continue in the future as well,’ says Aalto University Vice President Eero Eloranta.

Technology is a force for change in society, and maintaining a high standard for technological expertise is a vital necessity for Finland's success and capacity for renewal. Finland's vibrant startup scene is dominated by businesses that focus on technological innovations, and digitalisation is rapidly spreading to every level of society.
‘The majority of Finland's exports are based on engineering expertise. We must take care that Finland has enough high-quality expertise so that we can ensure that the product development and specialist services that are located in Finland aren’t moved abroad,’ notes Tampere University of Technology Vice President Petri Suomala.

A master's degree in technology or architecture forms a strong and versatile basis for building a career both in Finland and abroad. Employment prospects in the field of technology are looking bright. Technology firms recruit around 15 000 university technology graduates annually. According to a recent survey by Academic Engineers and Architects in Finland TEK, in 2016, almost 70 percent of Master of Science in Technology or Architecture graduates were already employed when they graduated.

‘Future working life will require the capacity for comprehending technological, human and societal activities in an innovative way. Mathematical and scientific skills will help create solutions for tricky problems that are related to natural resources, wellbeing, or economic sustainability. A Master of Science in Technology graduate who understands both people and technology has the capability for enacting great change in the future,’ notes Lappeenranta University of Technology Vice President Jaana Sandström.

Further information:
Eija Zitting, Head of Learning Services, Aalto University, [email protected], +358 50 364 7778
Eero Eloranta, Vice President, Aalto University, [email protected], +358 50 432 3411
Petri Suomala, Vice President, Tampere University of Technology, [email protected], +358 40 5918044
Jaana Sandström, Vice President, Lappeenranta University of Technology, [email protected], +358 40 571 6197,

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