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Three-dimensional visual art requires movement and immediacy

In her recent doctoral research, Riikka Mäkikoskela investigates the birth of three-dimensional works of art.

A three-dimensional work of art is both material and spatial, and its wholeness and meanings cannot be discerned from a single viewing point. It is imperative, in three-dimensional art practice, that one can go around or move within the work of art, says Riikka Mäkikoskela, who analyses the art field in her doctoral thesis Ympäri, sisällä. Kolmiulotteinen työskenteleminen kuvataiteessa (in English: Around, inside: Three-dimensional practice in visual art).

The dissertation research structures and conceptualises the practice where three-dimensional works of art are created. Mäkikoskela has presented the artistic material of her research in two exhibitions and in one research presentation. The dissertation thesis brings together practice and theory.

– My material encompasses the tasks of creating ten works of art. Some of the works may be referred to as spatial works of art and some sculptures. I have written an illustrated story for each of the works to describe its birth. My research data also includes other sculptors' writings and works of visual art. Those who played important roles in this are Robert Morris, Tony Cragg, Louise Bourgeois and Leena Valkeapää, Mäkikoskela explains.

                              

Reciprocity and opposition

In her research, Mäkikoskela is particularly interested in how the artist identifies phenomena through sense and bodily experiences and how thinking is enmeshed with all of that. When working on her own art, she tries to examine the artistic series of events of her work through her senses. Along with this, she has highlighted the ways to act and traditions of her social, cultural and historical practice.

Three-dimensional thinking in visual art is activity that is very instantaneous. Movement and moving around is related to it; thus a three-dimensional work of art is created in a series of events. According to Mäkikoskela, that series of events is described particularly by terms such as alertness of senses, material opposition, opening to think in a reciprocal manner as well as passive advancement and the cyclic nature of it all.

 

Public examination of the thesis

The public examination of Riikka Mäkikoskela's dissertation Ympäri, sisällä. Kolmiulotteinen työskenteleminen kuvataiteessa (In Finnish: Around, inside. Three-dimensional practice in visual art) will take place on Friday 11 December 2015 at 12 noon in the Sampo Auditorium of the Aalto University School of Art, Design and Architecture, Hämeentie 135 C, Helsinki, Docent Jyrki Siukonen will act as the opponent.

 

The dissertation can be ordered from the online book shop of the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture shop.aalto.fi, inquiries [email protected] or tel. +358 (0)50 313 7086.

 

Additional information

Riikka Mäkikoskela

Tel. +358 (0)45 131 3562

[email protected]

 

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