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The second Brain Twitter Conference 08 March 2018: non-stop neuroscience for 16 hours

The keynote topics include the social brain and emotions' effect on speech production.
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The first ever Brain Twitter Conference (#brainTC) was organized in 2017 with an impressive reach of 0.6 million Twitter users. This year #brainTC brings the latest advancements in neuroscience to Twitter on 8 March, as part of the International Brain Awareness Week. Follow and take part with #brainTC and follow the conference Twitter account @RealBrainTC.

The keynote speakers in 2018 include Professors Rebecca Saxe (MIT) and Sophie Scott (UCL), both also known for their inspiring TED talks. Saxe’s Twitter talk is about building a social brain, whereas Scott will tweet about emotions’ effect on speech production.

During the Twitter conference, researchers present their work in only 6 tweets, all marked with the hashtag #brainTC. The format forces creative use of images, emojis and videos. The Twitter platform makes interaction with the presenter easy, and discussion plays an important role in this social media event.

The Brain Twitter Conference was born from the idea that science should be free and available to all. The conference is free and open to all and, as it entails no travelling.

This year two researchers from the Harvard Medical School in Boston joined the organizing team, a group of researchers at the Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering at Aalto University.

Further information: brain.tc.

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