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Renovated Aalto Ice Tank opened for researchers

Collaboration in arctic technology research and education is important for the university and for companies’ competitiveness.
The guests at the opening ceremony were the first to see the glacial and renovated ice tank. Photograph Mikko Raskinen / Aalto University.

The renovated multipurpose basin, Aalto Ice Tank, was opened for researchers on 6th April, after a renovation that lasted over a year.

President Tuula Teeri, thanked the funders of this major infrastructure renovation, the Academy of Finland and the Ministry of Employment and the Economy, and stressed the importance of social impact in Aalto University’s strategy.

The guest of honour at the opening ceremony, Minister Olli Rehn, emphasised the significance of Arctic research to Finland and the importance of the sector’s collaborative networks. Minister Rehn observed that the future transport links would mean that Otaniemi would be an even more of a key area in collaboration between the university and business.

The Managing Director of Aker Arctic, Reko-Antti Suojanen, emphasised Finland’s multi-faceted skills in the field of Arctic technical research.  The first ice tank was established in Finland in 1969, and at  present there are two high level research tanks for ice and maritime transport structures.

Dean Gary Marquis, the host of the event, stated that collaboration with companies in the field guaranteed a long-term perspective to research and provided companies with the opportunity to maintain their competitiveness. Professor Marquis also referred to the opportunities for international collaboration in education.

In connection with the opening ceremony, a partnership agreement was signed between Aalto University and Finnish Marine Industries to maintain and develop excellence in Finnish maritime technologies.

Aalto Ice Tank

Aalto Ice Tank is ice model test basin where ice can be formed on the surface. Model tests are needed when researching physical phenomena associated with ice, ships, and marine structures, and for testing theoretical models covering Arctic marine technology and ice mechanisms. Among the most important current research themes are modelling the interaction between ice and structures and the movement of ships in a compressive ice fields.

The tank was built at the beginning of the 1980s for the Helsinki University of Technology and ice testing has been carried out there for over 25 years. Its large size, 40 metres wide and 40 metres long, makes it unique. The tank is multi-functional, open water tests can also be carried out in it. As well as for research and educational use, the Ice Tank is also used for commercial testing.

icetank.aalto.fi

 

 

 

 

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