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Laser scanning and augmented reality to enter theatres

The objective of the Virtual Adventure into the World of Theatre project is to increase the interest of young people in particular in culture.
The virtual theatre project utilises digital imaging, range camera techniques, 360 degree videos and images, augmented reality as well as laser scanning. Image: JP Virtanen.

In what ways can art institutes utilise new technologies such as augmented reality or laser scanning? The Virtual Adventure into the World of Theatre project, which will be launched in October 2017 at the Jyväskylä City Theatre, will research this topic.

The objective of the project is to develop digital cultural services that will capture the interest of young people in particular and to promote the production of creative works.

The design, recording and measurements for this Ministry of Education and Culture-funded project will begin in October 2017. Aalto University, Humak University of Applied Sciences and the Jyväskylä City Theatre are responsible for the realisation of the project.

'Our cooperation already began in 2016. It has resulted in a new type of operational digital testing platform, numerous joint trials, events, two funded projects and more than 30 publications. One of the most interesting trials included the application of augmented reality to historic sites. Thanks to 3D characterisations, the audience is able to get in touch with the historical figures who resided at Raseborg Castle and Kuusisto Case,' describes Professor Hannu Hyyppä from Aalto University.

'These 3D technologies have also been shown to young people during joint functional demo and pop-up days, which have been organised at Aalto University, Humak University of Applied Sciences, Omnia University of Applied Sciences and most recently at the Espoo Cultural Centre during the Children's Art Festival. Cooperation is now largely focused on cultural production and cultural management as well as interpretation and linguistic accessibility and communication expertise. This emphasises the connection between scientific and applied research and development activities.'

 

Bishop Arvid Kurki (1550s) shown in augmented reality in Kuusisto Castle. Image: Matti Kurkela

Inside the illusion

Aalto University and Humak University of Applied Sciences will be able to apply their expertise in practice at the Jyväskylä City Theatre. This work will be based on the needs of art education and the general public. During the trial, the audience can wander through the theatre in virtual reality, observe how the illusion and set for a performance are created, and how a theatre performance is put on. At the same time, the revenue logic created by digital services will be investigated.

'In late 2018, we will organise a seminar on digital cultural services related to the project, produce a publication on the topic area and share information on the results of the project,' explains Coordinator Marika Ahlavuo from the Aalto University Department of Built Environment.

Aalto University's Research Institute of Measuring and Modelling for the Built Environment (MeMo) and the Centre of Excellence in Laser Scanning Research will be responsible for the technical implementation of the project. Humak University of Applied Sciences will be responsible for the coordination of the project and the modelling of digital production methods. The Jyväskylä City Theatre will play a key role in the design and production of the content of the virtual adventure.

'Thanks to new measurement instruments and virtual 3D materials, we can study the effects of digitalisation on cultural events, the work methods used by cultural producers, partnerships, the audience and other stakeholders, says Matti Kurkela, 3D Studio Manager at Aalto University.

Further information:

Marika Ahlavuo, Coordinator
tel. +358 (0)50 5122509
[email protected]

Matti Kurkela, 3D Studio Manager LicSc (Tech)
[email protected]

Professor Hannu Hyyppä
[email protected]

Lecturer Pasi Toivanen
tel. +358 20 7621 372
[email protected]

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