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Influential 2017 building industry report confirms that art, design, and architecture can add to the value and quality of the built environment

Aalto University faculty, staff, and members of ACRE contributed to the 2017 building industry report ROTI art panel.
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The recently published 2017 ROTI report comes out every 2 years and outlines the basic guidelines and values for the construction industry.  For the first time this influential assessment did something different this year, it invited a panel of experts to comment on the place of art, design, and architecture in the role of the built environment.

Aalto University art coordinator, Outi Turpeinen, worked on the panel and contributed to the report, “This is an important moment. It is  remarkable to see creative practices more directly, or intentionally involved in the building industry.”

The panel — which also featured Aalto’s Prof Petteri Nisunen, lecturer Juhana Heikkinen and ACRE”s work place manager Päivi Hietanen — concluded that the inclusion of social and cultural values directed contributed to the environmental durability of the construction.  

As the demand for more user-aware or service oriented spaces increases, builders must consider and embed these more design driven elements early in the process in order to resonate with the end-user and add real value to the property and it’s community.

Turpeinen adds, “We must include this idea of art and creativity from from the start of the conception of the the project or the bid.  This acknowledgement and inclusion is a deep vindication of something that has been long held in the creative industries; that aesthetic values can help build a long lasting and resilient society.”

For more information on the panel, or the report visit: https://roti.fi/

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