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Energy saved significantly - the community's actions have produced results in Aalto

Aalto University has succeeded in significantly saving energy on the university campus thanks to both energy saving and energy efficiency measures. The biggest impact has been both community action and significant improvements to the energy efficiency of buildings and renewable energy.
Students outside
Photo: Aalto-yliopisto

Aalto University has reached the energy efficiency goal of its facilities ahead of schedule. In the period 2017-2025, the goal according to the Energy efficiency agreements (TETS) for the university's facilities has been to increase the energy consumption efficiency of the facilities by 10.5 percent compared to the consumption in 2015 by 2025. The goal was already achieved at the end of 2022. 

The most significant actions to achieve the goal have been the Metro Block's energy efficient solutions and better than standard construction, renewable energy systems in Dipoli (geothermal heat) and the Metro Block (geothermal heat and solar electricity), energy efficiency improvements of ventilation machines, and LED lighting projects.

Aalto University has also been involved in national Energy efficiency agreements for business facilities in the previous period 2011-2016. At that time, the efficiency target was 6 percent in relation to 2010 consumption. 

The Energy efficiency agreements for business facilities is a national system involving 700 companies and more than 130 municipalities. "TETS" is a part of the voluntary energy efficiency agreements covering the whole of Finland, which aims to achieve the energy saving goals set for Finland. With the voluntary nature, Finland has the opportunity to avoid national legislation deviating from international development or other coercive measures that could, for example, weaken the competitiveness of companies. 

Read more about the Energy efficiency agreements

Energy savings

The university strongly adheres to its energy saving goal

In terms of the university's overall energy saving goals, Aalto is on its way to the ambitious goal of 15 percent savings over 12 months (October 2022-September 2023). By the end of April, the Aalto community has saved more than 9 percent of energy.

The energy saving measures of the entire community have had a big impact on the results. If you still spot energy guzzlers on campus, let us know about them!

Blow the whistle on energy guzzlers

Reflections of two people on solar panels. Light blue sky is reflected on the background.

Aalto University aims at a 15 per cent annual energy saving

The impacts of the measures, targeted at the university buildings, will be monitored for a period of 12 months, after which the next steps will be agreed upon

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