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Data transfer speed of memory tags can be increased tenfold

Fast transfer of data with very low consumption of electricity allows for the use of greater recording capacity in memory tags, according to a fresh.

In his doctoral research Joni Jantunen, M. Sc. (tech.), developed an ultra-broadband impulse radio system that can be utilised in wireless memory tags.

The band width of a signal used in ultra-broadband data transfer is very large (more than 500 MHz), but the transmitting power is low. The signal of an impulse radio comprises short pulses. The new impulse radio system developed by Jantunen allows for transfer speeds more than ten times those of previous applications as well as the sensible use of recording capacity in such a way that the user can transfer a video recorded on a memory tag onto a telephone in a very short time.

"Thanks to technology developed for memory tags, the actions needed for reading and writing into memory tags can also be included in a mobile phone without leading to an unreasonable increase in power consumption by the telephone", Jantunen says.

Presentation videos and assembly instructions

Different kinds of remote IDs are currently in use in travel cards, for instance, but their information transfer rate is low and because of their small storage capacity, it is not possible to use them for storing pictures, music, or video, for instance.   Memory tags which utilise fast transfer rates make it possible to add digital information to practically any object or location without the need for other infrastructure or a broadband internet connection for the information transfer.

Memory tags can be utilised on sales packaging, brochures, for instance, or as part of products that would not otherwise contain batteries or a power source. They can include, for instance, a presentation video or virtual assembly instructions that can be read on a mobile phone, for instance. Connected with electronic paper or other modifiable material, a memory tag offers a fast channel of data transfer. Consequently, in the future, it will be possible even to change the outward appearance of a product digitally, which would allow for completely new applications.

The functions of memory tags can also be connected to sensors. When doing so, the sensor information can be stored using ambient energy, which means that the transfer of information would not require a battery, which simplifies sensor devices.

Defence of doctoral dissertation

The doctoral dissertation ”An Impulse UWB Radio System for Remotely-Powered Wireless Memory Tag Applications” will be defended at the Aalto University School of Electrical Engineering  on Friday, 12 June, 2015 at  12:00 in hall S4, Otakaari 5, Espoo. The opponent will be docent Pekka Pursula of the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT).

The dissertation is online https://aaltodoc.aalto.fi/handle/123456789/16525

Further information:
Joni Jantunen
Tel. +358 50 483 6336
[email protected]

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