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Computer Science jumped to 56th in the Times Higher Education Ranking

Engineering and technology placed 101-125 in the world.
Infografiikka tietotekniikan sijoituksesta 56:nneksi maailmassa.

Aalto University’s Computer Science is at 56th place in the world in the Times Higher Education (THE) World University Rankings 2020 by subject. The rise compared to last year was over 30 spots from last year’s 88th place. In the ranking list, Aalto was the first among the Nordic universities, and overall, over 700 universities were included.

In Engineering & Technology, Aalto’s ranking stayed in the range of 101–125 from over 1000  universities assessed. In both listings, Aalto came first among Finnish universities.

Times Higher Education is one of the world's most influential university rankings, and its general ranking measures the performance of universities with 13 indicators in the areas of international research, citations, teaching and research funding from companies.

In addition to the general list, THE produces rankings in specific fields of science as well as regional rankings. Aalto’s THE general ranking this year is 184.

Specific rankings are more relevant to Aalto University than the general rankings, as Aalto specialises in technology, business and arts. Depending on the calculation method, there are approximately 17 000–22 000 universities in the world.

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