News

Can you identify which concert hall this music is being played in? Test to see

Study shows music volume has a major impact on how the listener experiences the acoustics of a concert hall
Amsterdamin konserttisali
Amsterdam's Concertgebouw was one of the studied concert halls. Image: Jukka Pätynen

The volume and timbre of music have a significant impact on how people perceive the acoustics in a concert hall, according to two recent studies carried out by the research group of Aalto University Professor Tapio Lokki. Both have been published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, one of the most prestigious journals in its field.

The first study demonstrated that, based on the music alone, it is difficult to distinguish which concert hall a piece of music is being played in. The test subjects listened to recordings of a single violin and of part of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony, all played in four different concert halls: the rectangular Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and Herkulessaal in Munich, the vineyard-shaped Berlin Philharmonic, and the fan-shaped Cologne Philharmonic. They first heard a sample from the reference location, after which they tried to identify the reference location from four music samples.

It was easier to identify the hall when the same music sample played in each concert halls. If the reference sample was from a slightly different part of the same piece of music as used in the control locations, it was harder to identify the hall.

‘Even small differences in the music listened to made it very difficult to identify concert halls of similar size and architecture. Halls that were very different to each other were clearly more easily identified regardless of the music,’ explains postdoctoral researcher Antti Kuusinen.

Kuunteluhuone akustiikan laboratoriossa
The listening room in Aalto Acoustics Lab, where the listening tests were made. Image: Benoit Alary

Another study showed that the acoustics of a concert hall are experienced differently depending on the volume at which the orchestra is playing. The concert halls used in the study were the Helsinki’s Musiikkitalo, Munich Herkulessaal, Berlin Philharmonic and Berlin Konzerthaus.

The subjects listened to the orchestra playing at different volume levels, from the quietest piano pianoissimo to the strongest forte fortissimo, after which they placed the concert halls in order according to how loud and enveloping they experienced the music to be. The order of the concert halls changed in some cases related to the volume of the music.

‘Traditionally, the acoustics of concert halls are studied by using objective measurements to calculate acoustic parameters, such as reverberation time, which is independent of the characteristics or dynamics of the music. Our research clearly shows that this is insufficient for understanding the acoustics in its entirety, because both the timbre of the sound and the listeners’ perceptions shift as the volume changes,’ Lokki explains.

Lokki’s research group has also previously studied how the acoustics of concert halls affect the emotional reactions evoked by the music. The studies indicated that halls with acoustics that support large dynamic fluctuations evoke the strongest emotional experiences in listeners.

You can try identifying the acoustics of concert halls yourself here. Use headphones to take the test! https://anttikuusinen.shinyapps.io/RoomAcousticsMatchingExperiment/

Links to the articles in The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America:

https://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/10.0001915

https://asa.scitation.org/doi/10.1121/10.0002101

Further information:

Tapio Lokki

Tapio Lokki

Professori (Associate professor)
T405 Dept. Signal Processing and Acoustics
  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Read more news

Henkilö seisoo kädet puuskassa seinän edessä, jolle on heijastettu virtapiirejä esittävä kuva ja katselee tyynen näköisenä poispäin kamerasta.
Press releases, Studies Published:

FITech Network University gained extra time for free ICT courses

By decision of the Ministry of Education and Culture, the courses open to all in the field of information and communication technology will be continued until the end of 2023.
Tilannekuvia siitä, miten hiukkaset muuttavat muotoaan prosessin eri vaiheissa niitten alkuperäisestä jakautumisesta lopputulokseen. Kuva: Aalto-yliopisto
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

Researchers mimic how water and wind create complex shapes in nature

No hands required: new study shows how particles can be directed into desired shapes with energy fields and smart algorithm.
Kuva Mekong-joelta
Press releases Published:

Changing climate increases the need for water diplomacy

Water issues are increasingly political, meaning tensions need to be tackled in new ways
Physicists make square droplets and liquid lattices. Picture: Active Matter research group led by Prof. Timonen, Aalto University
Press releases Published:

Physicists make square droplets and liquid lattices

Driving systems out of equilibrium with electric fields proves useful for creating liquid shapes that are nearly impossible to find in nature