News

Are we at the limits of measuring water-repellent surfaces?

As we develop extremely liquid-repellent surfaces, the errors in existing measurement techniques are getting too large.
Water droplet on a surface
A water droplet resting on a highly repellent surface (Image credit Mika Latikka)

How liquids are repelled by a surface – a property called “wettability”– is important for engineers to develop aircraft that resist ice formation; for fashion designers developing outdoor gear that repels rain and dirt; and every possible field in between. Researchers developing whole new surface materials in the lab also need accurate measurement of wetting properties so they can compare how different surfaces behave. For over two centuries, the standard method for defining how the droplet and the surface interact has been by measuring the “contact angle” of the droplet. The contact angle is the angle between the edge of the droplet and the surface it lies upon. Research at Aalto University is now calling the effectiveness of this method into question, in a perspective article published 15 March in the journal Science.

The problem with the contact angle method – according to Professor Robin Ras – is that it depends on both the accuracy of camera used to image the droplet and a subjective decision by the scientist about where in the image the droplet meets the surface. As scientists and engineers develop increasingly water-repellent materials, our ability to measure how effective they are decreases because the errors in the measurement get substantially worse as the ability to repel water increases.

Where the measurement line is chosen alters the outcome of the measurement
How errors arise in the traditional method (image credit: Maja Vuckovac)

Professor Ras’s team has carefully quantified the errors that arise from contact angle measurements, and his group are developing alternative methods for measuring how water-repellent surfaces interact with droplets. Newer methods which measure the adhesion or friction forces between the surface and the droplets not only have lower errors, but allow quantification in physical terms that is more relevant to the engineers developing new materials.

“We encourage researchers to rethink the relevance of contact angles in hydrophobic surface characterization and propose force as the next-generation benchmark quantity” says Professor Ras.

By raising the awareness among the wider scientific community that better methods for measuring surface wettability are out there, Professor Ras and his team hope that others will be able to make further discoveries currently unobtainable using traditional measurement techniques.

Link to the full article: http://doi.org/10.1126/science.aav5388

For further details contact:

Professor Robin Ras
[email protected]
http://physics.aalto.fi/smw

 

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Read more news

Lauri Parkkonen and the family cat, Roosa. Photo: Lauri Parkkonen, Aalto, University.
Press releases Published:

New imaging technique to find out what happens in the brains of cats and dogs

A brain imaging device based on quantum optical sensors could also be used to study the brains of human babies
Kuvaa laitteittosta Aalto-yliopsiton Kylmälaboratoriossa.
Press releases Published:

Perpetual motion is possible – Scientists at Aalto University’s Low Temperature Lab observed the interaction of two time-crystals that bend the laws of physics

Time-crystals are a phase of matter in which the particles more in a perpetually repeating cycle with no external input of energy. Researchers were able to create two time-crystals at Aalto University’s Low Temperature Lab and observe their interaction. In the future, time-crystals might have applications in devices such as quantum computer memory components.
Valkoinen laboratoriotakki sekä analyysityökalu, jolla voidaan mitata veripisarasta särkylääkkeen pitoisuus.
Press releases Published:

Portable and quick analytics tool can revolutionise the pain killer diagnostics market

Fepod Oy Ltd, an Aalto University based start-up, has developed an analysis tool that allows healthcare professionals to measure the concentration of paracetamol, opioids and other painkillers real concentration in a single drop of blood.
Yhdistelmäkuva, jossa näkyy revontulia, Maa, mittauksia.
Press releases Published:

Suomi 100 did what could previously be done only by much larger satellites: photographing and studying the aurora borealis

Studying the aurora borealis area helps in the development of safe telecommunications, for example.