Aalto Distinguished Professor Olli Ikkala awarded academic knighthood of the Ordre des Palmes académiques

Image: Lasse Lecklin.

Professor Ikkala was recognised for his contributions to advancing scientific partnerships between France and Finland.

On 21 November, Aalto Distinguished professor Olli Ikkala was awarded the Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes académiques medal by the French Ambassador in Finland, Serge Tomasi. The Ordre des Palmes académiques (Order of Academic Palms) is a French order of merit bestowed on academics and other civilians. The Chevalier, or Knight’s medal, is one of the three grades awarded. The Order des Palmes académiques was established by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1808 as a means of honouring distinguished academics.

In his speech, Ambassador Serge Tomasi praised Professor Ikkala for his invaluable support of bilateral partnerships between French and Finnish universities.

Professor Ikkala has contributed to collaborations with France for many years. He worked as a part-time professor in Grenoble for three years and as a visiting professor in Paris in 2013.

Catherine Métivier, Olli Ikkala and Eric Coatanea, recipients of the Ordre des Palmes académiques. Image: Embassy of France in Finland.
Catherine Métivier, Olli Ikkala and Eric Coatanea, recipients of the Ordre des Palmes académiques. Image: Embassy of France in Finland.

“I am currently finalising an article with my French collaborators on nanoionics’, Professor Ikkala explains.

 

Olli Ikkala has worked as a Professor of Applied Physics at Aalto University for 20 years, specialising in biomimetic materials and molecular self-assembly. He has published more than 200 academic articles, several of which have featured in the Science and Nature journal series. Professor Ikkala also holds around 20 patents. In addition, he leads the Centre of Excellence in Molecular Engineering of Biosynthetic Hybrid Materials (HYBER).

Recipients of the Ordre des Palmes académiques also belong to the Association des Membres de l’Ordre Palmes Académiques (A.M.O.P.A), which is also known as the violet legion.

Further information:

Olli Ikkala
Aalto Distinguished Professor
Aalto University
[email protected]

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