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Besides studying Building Technology, student James Roney plays pool at Aalto

Interest in living in Finland brought James Roney from USA to Aalto for his Master’s studies.
Student James Roney cross-country skiing

I have been interested in Finland for many years. The opportunity to combine my field of study living in Finland, in addition to considerable tuition savings compared to my home country made it a logical choice. I chose to study Building technology in Aalto as it was the closest field to my bachelor’s, which was Civil Engineering. 

The best thing about my programme are the professors, who have a lot of industry associates, who they bring in for valuable guest lectures and jobsite tours for added real-world relevance. When thinking of my favorite courses, I particularly enjoyed prestressed concrete, and within that the included tour of the very awesome Parma prestressed plant in Vihti. 

On my regular days I get up (I live off campus) and hop a metro to school where I attend lectures and do my assignments. I might have lunch with my friends and on certain days we’ll meet up to play badminton or shoot pool or blow off steam. Then I’ll head home and do assignments. At the moment I am a member of Aalto’s pool and billiards club, and have played golf with the Business School’s golf club. 

In the future I’m hoping to get a job in Finland either in structural design or maybe at Meyer Turku in shipbuilding. I was able to take a course from the Naval Architecture school and found it very interesting.  

My tips for Incoming Students are: Ask early and often, as the school moves pretty fast, don’t waste it wondering what is going on. Get involved with instructors, advisors, and friends quickly. Enjoy this time, it’ll go by fast! Get out there and explore! 

Read more about the programme

Students at Aalto University's concrete materials laboratory.

Master's Programme in Building Technology

The Master’s Programme in Building Technology educates future leaders who seamlessly merge science and human-centred design to help the transition towards a smarter built environment. This can mean, for example, responding to the global need of energy-efficient buildings and scaled circular economy systems.

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