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The probabilistic Machine Learning Group (PML) is looking for master students interested in working on machine learning projects

We are looking for capable MSc candidates to work on challenging research problems together with
university researchers.

All positions are fully funded and they are filled as soon as suitable candidates are found. The work on the projects will start as soon as possible.It is also possible for students who are not yet in their MSc thesis stage to apply.

Interested applicants should send an email to the responsible person and attach their CV,
excerpt of their study records, and a brief justification for why they are interested. In the
application please elaborate past experience in programming and machine learning.

All projects give opportunities to participate in writing an international scientific publication,
which is necessary experience for both doctoral studies and a company career in data science.

Please see closer information on the positions:

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