News

The German Society of Material Science awards Professor Mady Elbahri the DGM prize of 2020

The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Materialkunde e.V. (DGM) has recognized Professor Mady Elbahri at the School of Chemical Engineering, for his outstanding scientific achievements in the field of Nanoscience and nanotechnology.
Professor Mady Elbahri

He especially concentrates in the development, synthesis, and characterization of innovative functional materials with a diverse range of applications such as in the fields of energy, environment, and life science. His particularly noteworthy contributions are found in his research on disordered plasmonic metamaterials, the collective interaction of localized plasmon resonances and chromophores as well as his self-developed Leidenfrost synthesis, which is an environmentally friendly technique of synthesizing new materials in aqueous mediums.

The DGM Prize is awarded to an excellent scientist who is in the middle of his research career, for exceptional scientific or technical achievements, that represent a publicised, documented breakthrough in materials science and engineering or have opened a new field of research. The DGM Prize consists of a certificate and the sculpture "Durchbruch" (breakthrough).

The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Materialkunde e.V. (DGM) is the largest technical science association for materials science and materials engineering in Europe. For more than 90 years, it has consolidated the expertise of the specialist fields of science and industry: representing the interests of its members from the fields of science and industry - and as guarantor for the systematic development of the fields of materials science and materials engineering.

Mady Elbahri

Professor (Associate Professor)
Nanochemistry and Nanoengineering
  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Read more news

Research & Art Published:

Testing virtual library card

Testing virtual library card
Nighttime picture of a snowy road lined with trees.
Press releases Published:

Snap, crackle, pop! — the sounds of frost actually come from the sky

Breakthrough research reveals that the popping sound associated with frost is in fact mostly coming from the atmosphere.
Long-haired woman smiling, red cloth in the background
Awards and Recognition Published:

Young Landscape Architect of the Year 2024 is Aada Taipale

The award is particularly focused on taking an open-minded, fresh approach to landscape architecture.
Comic-style illustration of Solip Park's research methods
Awards and Recognition Published:

Doctoral Researcher Solip Park's Paper Receives Honorable Mention at CHI 2024

Doctoral researcher Solip Park's paper has recently garnered attention at the prestigious CHI 2024 conference, earning an "honorable mention" distinction.