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Scientists demonstrate efficient energy transfer mechanism for graphene sensors and transistors

Aalto University researchers have demonstrated a new type of scattering process to provide an efficient energy transfer mechanism in graphene.

This finding advances the development of extremely sensitive graphene sensors as well as graphene transistors. The results, published online in Nano Letters on May 27, were partly funded by European Union via project RODIN (www.FP7rodin.eu).

Nano Letters article: Electron-Phonon Coupling in Suspended Graphene: Supercollisions by Ripples
Nano Letters, DOI: 10.1021/nl404258a, (2014)
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl404258a

For more details:

Pertti Hakonen, Prof.
email: pertti.hakonen*at*aalto.fi
m. +358 50 344 2316
Aalto University
O. V. Lounasmaa Laboratory

Research Group webpages
http://lounasmaalab.aalto.fi/en/research/low_temperature_laboratory/nano_group/

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