News

Presented by Aalto’s School of Arts, Design and Architecture, SCSMI2017 offers a rare international film conference in Finland.

For 4 days in June Aalto’s Töölö Campus will be crowded by enthusiastic film and media professionals, researchers and students, gathering around 100 talks on philosophy, aesthetics, history and cognitive psychology of cinematic storytelling.
maiden_sc06_22_en_en.jpg

Running 11 - 14 June, this interdisciplinary conference is unique in its kind - in addition to bringing over 80 international key figures of contemporary cognitive film research to Helsinki, it also highlights several artist presentations and offers film viewing sessions.

Says organizer Pia Tikka, “We could not be more excited to have this incredible programme here at Aalto University.  It could not happen at a better time of year and the discussions promise to be engaging and inspiring. In fact, while Finland is famous for several international film festivals, it has not hosted a film research conference of this volume and internationality for several decades."

The Society for Cognitive Studies of Moving Image (SCSMI) is an interdisciplinary organization made up of scholars interested in cognitive, philosophical, aesthetic, historical, psychological, neuroscientific, and evolutionary approaches to the analysis of film and other moving-image media.

The SCSMI2017 conference is organised by the Department of Media and the Department of Film, Television, and Scenography at Aalto University's School of Arts, Design and Architecture, in association with the department of Film and Television Studies, University of Helsinki. The film department goes back to 1959 when it started as a department of cinematography. Today Aalto offers one of the most prestigious educations in film and media studies. Almost a half-decade later Medialab was a pioneer in teaching emerging technologies in digital media, and has since been applying cinematic storytelling in computer games and virtual reality projects.

The highlights of the conference are many, including a keynote by Philosopher Dr Paisley Livingston on "cinema as philosophy” discussing Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman’s relation to the ideas of Finnish philosopher and psychologist Eino Kaila.  As one of the key members of the Aalto University’s celebrated neuroscience project aivoAALTO, Lauri Nummenmaa will discuss how cinema may help to understand the brain mechanisms supporting human emotions.  Virtual reality is a word on the lips of many filmmakers today, and Dr. Asta Kärkkäinen, a Principal Researcher in Digital Media R&D Spatial Audio in Nokia Technologies will talk about “3D audio in immersive movies."

These lectures and many more can be found online in the conference programme.

 

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

aalto university comet interceptor image: George Brydon, MSSL/UCL
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

The ESA Comet Interceptor enters mission analysis phase with significant Finnish contributions

A new Comet Interceptor mission was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) for the early mission analysis phase. Comet Interceptor, planned to be launched in 2028, will study an entirely new comet which is flying through our Solar System for the first time.
Sotavangit
Press releases Published:

WarSampo publishes new Linked Open Data on the over 4,000 Finnish prisoners of war in Soviet Union

The Prisoners of War web application is based on archival material from Finland and Russia. The data is a part of the WarSampo application, which has been used by over half a million Finns to date.
Starting Up Pic: Aalto University
Press releases, Studies, University Published:

Aalto University launches free-for-all online entrepreneurship course 'to make sure no great idea goes unpursued'

Starting Up is co-created by students and the European startup community and is a new contribution to open education by the country that brought Elements of AI to the world
Äitiä ahdistanut raskaus voi näkyä pikkuvauvan tunnereaktioissa
Press releases Published:

Expectant mothers’ pregnancy-related anxiety may alter how infant brains respond to sad speech

Study shows correlation between mothers’ self-reported pregnancy-related anxiety, and babies’ blood flow to brain areas responsible for emotional responses when listening to sad speech