News

Nearly everything about molecular assembly on 2D materials

Avijit's and Kaustuv's review out in Nanotechnology
bitmap_en_en.png

Molecular self-assembly is a well-known technique to create highly functional nanostructures on surfaces. Self-assembly on two-dimensional (2D) materials is a developing field driven by the interest in functionalization of 2D materials in order to tune their electronic properties. We review this progress with an emphasis on the electronic properties of the adsorbates and the substrate in well-defined systems, as unveiled by scanning tunneling microscopy. With the current surge of activity on building van der Waals heterostructures from atomically thin crystals, molecular self-assembly has the potential to add an extra level of flexibility and functionality for applications ranging from flexible electronics and OLEDs to novel electronic devices and spintronics.

The review was published in Nanotechnology

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

Biorefinery and fuels
Cooperation, Research & Art Published:

Renewable fuel made from biorefinery residues

Lignin-based automotive and aviation fuels are one step closer to market as a new EU-funded project aims to develop new production methods for lignin-based transport fuels.
Graphic showing 2 phases of the perovskite material CsPbI3
Research & Art Published:

Theoretical study elucidates deep surface structure of emerging perovskite material

Newly published work by doctoral candidate Azimatu Seidu (CEST group) reveals detailed electronic and atomistic structure of cesium lead triiodide (CsPbI3), an emerging perovskite material
Kaksi poikaa leikkimässä ilta-auringossa kaupungin viheralueella, jonka keskellä on pieni lampi ja sen ympärillä kiviasetelma.
Cooperation, Research & Art Published:

The potential of urban green spaces in climate change mitigation

Aalto University is involved in the CO-CARBON research project, which seeks ways to integrate the carbon sequestration of green spaces in urban planning and decision-making.
Researchers. Photo: Unto Rautio
Research & Art Published: