News

Metsähovi Radio Observatory renovation is complete

The renovation of Finland's only radio observatory is an investment into national astronomical research.
Metsähovin radiotutkimusaseman uudisosa kuva: Joni Tammi
Metsähovi Radio Observatory in January 2021. Image: Joni Tammi / Aalto University

The extensive renovation of Aalto University's Metsähovi Radio Observatory, which took more than a year, is now complete. The oldest part of the observatory, built in the 1970s, was dismantled. An extension part, which was built in the 1990s, was renovated, and a completely new wing was built in connection with it. The new facilities include a room for meetings and seminars, workspaces, a kitchen, social facilities, and laboratory facilities.

In the renovation, building service technology was upgraded, and energy efficiency was significantly improved: for example, oil heating was replaced by environmentally friendly geothermal heating, more energy efficient windows were installed, ventilation was upgraded, and heat recovery was introduced.

‘We are eagerly waiting to continue our research work and teaching, and to receive guests in our upgraded facilities’, says Metsähovi Director Joni Tammi.

The Metsähovi Radio Observatory monitors, for example, radiation emanating from the sun and from black holes on every day of the year, and the renovation period was no exception.

‘Our technical team succeeded in ensuring that the equipment and observations also worked during the renovation, even though this required special arrangements of many kinds’, says laboratory engineer Juha Kallunki. For example, radio silence, which is in force over the entire area, was challenging for the contractors, because radio transmitters can be found in almost all types of construction machines nowadays.

Major investment into national astronomical research

Aalto University has invested heavily in the upgrading of Finland's only astronomical radio observatory and its research equipment in recent years. In a major operation last summer, the radar dome of Metsähovi's main research instrument, a 14-metre radio telescope, was replaced.

‘This is an indication that Aalto University also wants to invest in basic scientific research. The upgrades ensure that our activities and radio astronomy research in Finland can continue far into the future’, Joni Tammi says.

Read more

Changing the Aalto University's Metsähovi radio observatory radome. Photo: Kalle Kataila

Like a massive golf ball - Metsähovi Radio Observatory got a new radome

The Metsähovi Radio Observatory's landmark protects the telescope and enables year-round study of the Sun and black holes.

News
Ilmakuva Metsähovin radiotutkimusasemasta, kuva: Mikko Raskinen

The lure of cosmic mysteries

Astronomer Joni Tammi wants to uncover the secrets of the universe; secrets that have so far managed to elude us. However, with new advances in technology, the next major space discoveries are just around the corner.

Give for the future
Metsähovi Radio Telescope

Metsähovi Radio Observatory

Metsähovi Radio Observatory is the only astronomical radio observatory in Finland. Metsähovi’s main instrument is the 14-metre radio telescope, which is used around the clock, every day of the year. Its observational data is used, e.g., for studying active galaxies, the Sun, and the rotation of the Earth.

  • Published:
  • Updated:

Read more news

Comic-style illustration of Solip Park's research thesis
Awards and Recognition Published:

Doctoral Researcher Solip Park's Paper Receives Honorable Mention at CHI 2024

Doctoral researcher Solip Park's paper has recently garnered attention at the prestigious CHI 2024 conference, earning an "honorable mention" distinction.
Campus Published:

A! Walk-Wild edibles

Spring is here, plants are starting to grow and bloom. The first walk of 'A! walk' series started with meeting those newborn plants...
Skanskan kehitysjohtaja Jan Elfving esiintyy Rakennustekniikan päivässä 2024
Cooperation Published:

Civil Engineering invites companies to participate in future development work

A stakeholder event organized by the Department of Civil Engineering has already become a spring tradition. Civil Engineering Day was held on April 25 in Dipoli Otaniemi.
Professor Riikka Puurunen, Professor Patrick Rinke and IT Application Owner Lara Ejtehadian holding sunflowers and diplomas
Awards and Recognition, Campus, Research & Art Published:

Aalto Open Science Award ceremony brought together Aaltonians to discuss open science

Last week we gathered at A Grid to celebrate the awardees of the Aalto Open Science Award 2023 and discuss open science matters with the Aalto community.