Games and Virtual Reality in Performing Arts (GVRIPA) minor - APPLY NOW!

Games and Virtual Reality in Performing Arts (GVRIPA) minor (25 credits) dives into the theory, methodology and practise of the interdisciplinary field of experimental game performances, installations and events.

The minor is is produced by Aalto University, School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Master’s Programme in Design for Theatre, Film and Television and Master`s Programme of Media together with The University of Arts, Theatre Academy, Master’s Programme in Lighting Design, Master`s Programme in Sound Design and Master`s Programme in Writing.

The GVRIPA-minor is a follow-up and extension of the Digital Visual Design - Advanced Intermediality in Performance (DiViDe) minor, first piloted in 2016.

Application time for exchange students is 15.9-15.10.2019

Detailed application procedure:
https://into.aalto.fi/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=4854445
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