News

G3 gathers top researchers and innovative players in social- and healthcare services

HEMA research group kicks off new G3 project within the Tekes Wellbeing and health programme

Social and health care services need better tools for outcome-based management. G3-project gathers together multidisciplinary and internationally networked research institute, Aalto University’s HEMA-group, and the most innovative players in the area of social and health care services (Doctagon, Omasairaala, Noona Healthcare, HUR, HUS). The project aims to generate the necessary scientific basis to underpin informed managerial and policy decisions that improve healthcare outcomes. The understanding developed in the project will be codified into a toolkit that can assist both policy makers and healthcare providers develop their outcome-based management.

For more information:
Tomi Malmström, Tel. +358 50 323 4775

  • Published:
  • Updated:

Read more news

Two hexagonal arrays of prisms with a blue lattice inbetween.
Research & Art Published:

New quantum entangled material could pave way for ultrathin quantum technologies

Researchers reveal the microscopic nature of the quantum entangled state of a new monolayer van der Waals material
Cone Calorimeter Testing
Research & Art Published:

BIOSUOJA project is saving lives by developing bio-based fire retardant coatings

A talented group of young researchers is making these non-toxic coatings out of wood.
A visual AI-generated sketch for urban development in Battersea district in London
Cooperation, Research & Art, Studies Published:

Architecture students use AI to design social innovations for London

The project combined qualitative evolutionary design and visual generative artificial intelligence, for the first time.
The picture shows the menu, in which the CO2 emissions are marker with color codes and the price in euros.
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

New research: Labeling carbon footprint affects the choices of mass catering customers – and the labeling method matters, too!

A recent study conducted in Germany shows that customers in a student canteen choose low-emission meals when presented with the carbon footprint of meals. This effect was strongest when the information was color-coded in a traffic-light scheme and translated into environmental costs in euros. According to one of the researchers, these findings could also be relevant for Finland, where mass catering is particularly popular.