News

Finnish research team reveals how emotions are mapped in the body

Researchers Aalto University have revealed how emotions are experienced in the body.
aalto_university_research_sci_emotionbodies_web_en.jpg

Emotions adjust our mental and also bodily states to cope with the challenges detected in the environment. These sensations arising from the bodily changes are an important feature of our emotional experiences. For example, anxiety may be experienced as pain in the chest, whereas falling in love may trigger warm, pleasurable sensations all over the body. New research from Aalto University reveals, how emotions are literally experienced through the body.

The researchers found that the most common emotions trigger strong bodily sensations, and the bodily maps of these sensations were topographically different for different emotions. The sensation patterns were, however, consistent across different West European and East Asian cultures, highlighting that emotions and their corresponding bodily sensation patterns have a biological basis.

- Emotions adjust not only our mental, but also our bodily states. This way the prepare us to react swiftly to the dangers, but also to the opportunities such as pleasurable social interactions present in the environment. Awareness of the corresponding bodily changes may subsequently trigger the conscious emotional sensations, such as the feeling of happiness, tells assistant professor Lauri Nummenmaa from Aalto University.

- The findings have major implications for our understanding of the functions of emotions and their bodily basis. On the other hand, the results help us to understand different emotional disorders and provide novel tools for their diagnosis.

The research was carried out on line, and over 700 individuals from Finland, Sweden and Taiwan took part in the study. The researchers induced different emotional states in their Finnish and Taiwanese participants. Subsequently the participants were shown with pictures of human bodies on a computer, and asked to colour the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing.

The research was funded by European Research Council (ERC), The Academy of Finland and the Aalto University (aivoAALTO project)

The results were published on 31 December (U.S. Eastern time) in the scientific journal  Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences of The United States of America (PNAS).

Original publication:
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/12/26/1321664111.full.pdf+html?with-ds=yes

Figure summarizing the main findings of the study  http://becs.aalto.fi/~lnummen/Emotionbodies.pdf

Participate in the ongoing experiment :  http://becs.aalto.fi/~lnummen/participate.htm

Figure caption: Different emotions are associated with discernible patterns of bodily sensations.

Contact information:
Assistant Professor Lauri Nummenmaa
Aalto University and Turku PET Centre
[email protected]
p. +358 50 431 9931

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

Janne Lindqvist
Research & Art Published:

Janne Lindqvist: You can’t help if you stay in the ivory tower

This sociable professor of computer science knows how to forge his own path and trusts his instinctive curiosity towards different research topics.
maankäyttö
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

Feeding the world without wrecking the planet is possible

Almost half of current food production is harmful to our planet – causing biodiversity loss, ecosystem degradation and water stress. But as world population continues to grow, can that last?
Large arena filled with a crowd watching a game of DOTA2 projected on big screens
Research & Art Published:

Digital athletics in analogue stadiums

Researchers study why people watch computer gamers live
Julia Lohmann's Department of Seaweed at WEF. Photo: Mikko Raskinen
Research & Art Published:

Julia Lohmann: ‘We know too much and do too little’

Lohmann’s magnificent seaweed pavilion encourages leaders to make difficult decisions and establish a ‘do-tank’ way of collaborating at the 50th World Economic Forum in Davos.