News

Faster method to read quantum memory

Scientists at Aalto University and VTT have developed a faster way to read information out of qubits, the basic building blocks of a quantum computer
JI
Artistic impression of qubit (blue chip) readout using the quantum states of a resonator (blue and red jets). Figure credit: Heikka Valja.

The potential computing revolution that quantum computers promise is based on their weird property called superposition. Namely, qubits can take both logical states 0 and 1 simultaneously, and any value in between. By mastering superpositions of the whole quantum memory, quantum computers can quickly solve problems that would require too much computing time from regular computers working with simply 0s and 1s.

However, qubits are sensitive, and currently hold quantum information for less than a millisecond at a time, even when kept frozen at temperatures colder than the dark side of the moon. To extract any useful information, the method that reads information from qubits must take the least amount of time as possible, allowing as few errors as possible.

Joni Ikonen, a PhD student at Aalto University, has developed a new method published in Physical Review Letters that helps do just that. Until now, the method used to read information from a qubit was to apply a short microwave pulse to the superconducting circuit containing the qubit and then measure the reflected microwave. After 300 nanoseconds, the state of the qubit can be deduced from the behavior of the reflected signal.

We were able to complete the readout in 300 nanoseconds in our first experiments, but we think that going below 100 nanoseconds is just around the corner,’ says Joni Ikonen.

By improving the speed and accuracy of the information retrieved from qubits, scientists may be able to move closer to realising the promise of useful quantum computing.

‘This is an amazing result in getting the slippery qubits in order. I hope that it will help the community in the future to reach quantum supremacy and error correction, the path to a quantum computer of practical value,’ says Dr. Möttönen, who co-supervised the work with Dr. Jan Goetz

The QCD research team is part of the national centre of excellence – Quantum Technology Finland, funded by the Academy of Finland. The experimental research was carried out at the national OtaNano research infrastructure for micro, nano, and quatum technologies.

The full article, Qubit Measurement by Multichannel Driving is published today in Physical Review Letters DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.122.080503

For more information, please contact:

Joni Ikonen
Quantum Computing and Devices Group, PhD student
Aalto University
[email protected]
Mobile: +358400539317
Languages: English, Finnish

Dr Mikko Möttönen
Quantum Computing and Devices Group, Group Leader
Aalto University
Mobile: +358505940950
[email protected]
Languages: English, Finnish

Dr Jan Goetz
Quantum Computing and Devices Group, Research Fellow
Aalto University 
[email protected]
Mobile: +358503003445
Languages: German, English

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Read more news

A green laser light shining on a sample stage between two magnets
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

New nanoscale device for spin technology

Spin waves could unlock the next generation of computer technology, a new component allows physicists to control them
Apulaisprof. Emma-Riikka Myllymäki
Research & Art Published:

Emma-Riikka Myllymäki: Why company reporting needs to be excellent

By producing high-quality reports on both their business and sustainability impacts, companies build trust and aid stakeholder decision-making.
SSD21 banner
Research & Art Published:

Our un­will­ing­ness to sac­ri­fice com­fort: 3 ta­boos pre­vent­ing sustainable trans­form­a­tion

Why is it so difficult for us to change our current practices for more sustainable ones? Are there any explicit taboos that hinder decision-making? Sustainability Science Days, Finland’s largest event in sustainability science, addresses sustainability challenges, including both taboos and innovative ways of promoting sustainability.
Kerrostalo ja kallioita
Cooperation, Press releases, Research & Art Published:

The SUBURBAN PRIDE project examines the relationship between mental images of suburbs and the built environment

The multidisciplinary project combines history of architecture, sociology, and research in critical cultural heritage and landscape architecture. The purpose of the project, based on research and workshops, is to build a sustainable future for suburbs.