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Eero Kasanen's paper accepted to Journal of Business Ethics

"Boundaries Between Business and Politics: A Study on the Division of Moral Labor”

Article "Boundaries Between Business and Politics: A Study on the Division of Moral Labor” by Eero Kasanen and Jukka Mäkinen (Aalto University School of Business) has been accepted for publication in Journal of Business Ethics.

Abstract:

The dominant framing of the political corporate social responsibility (CSR) discussion challenges the traditional economic conception of the firm and aims to produce a paradigm shift in CSR studies wherein the traditional, apolitical view of corporations’ roles in society is
replaced by the political conception of CSR. In this paper, we show how the major framing of the political CSR discussion calls for a redirection to take international hard legal and moral regulations, as well as the need for the boundaries between business and politics into account.

 

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