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Creative Commons licenses allow use for education and research – See the ImagOA guide

Aalto Learning Centre’s Resource Guides has published ImagOA guide that helps to take advantage of the opportunities offered by citation methods and Creative Commons licenses.

Creative Commons licenses enable the use of third party material in education and research in universities. Correct citation practices are a key enabler.

ImagOA guide has a list of correct citation practises and a list of legal sources for the use in citation. The Learning Centre’s Visual Resource Centre (VRC) can also help to find and use visual material according to the ImagOA guidance.
 

Further information: ImagOA – Open Science and Images http://libguides.aalto.fi/imagoa_eng

More information about Learning Centre’s information services and training on visual resources: http://libguides.aalto.fi/vrc_eng

Further information about copyright from Art Universities Copyright Advice.

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