News

CEST receives seed funding to develop more efficient fuel cells

The Materials Platform has awarded Dr. Annukka Santasalo-Aarnio, Prof. Michael Gasik, Dr. Jingrui Li and Prof. Patrick Rinke seed funding to research more efficient fuel cells. The interdisciplinary team from Aalto's Chemistry and Physics Department will use the funding to prepare a large scale application for a H2020 call.

New energy systems are needed that can facilitate the transition to CO2 free energy production and use. The seed funding project focuses on phenomena that are critical for the development of more efficient hydrogen production with SO2 depolarized electrolysers (SDE). Such SDE could become commercially viable. The objectives of the project are: a deeper understanding of the physical-chemical phenomena and of key reactions, computational simulations of the catalytic processes as well as validation of the phenomena. With this new knowledge, it will be possible to enhance the cell reactions, increase the system lifetime and decrease the noble metal catalysts loading. The goal of the proposed study is to prepare a new proposal for an upcoming EU Horizon 2020 call Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (FCH JU) in 2018, where this novel technology will be combined with concentrated solar power systems.

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

Learning Centre graphics
Research & Art Published:

Dawsonera database has been shut down

Dawsonera database has been shut down due to its provider’s going into administration.
Woman wearing an orange-colored dress and standing on the grass in between birch trees
Research & Art Published:

From her own little world to the other side of the globe

Her studies and her parents used to be her whole world, but now Dr. Avleen Malhi lives on the other side of the world, designs an Airbnb for car drivers, and encourages women to pursue their goals
Magnetic materials
Research & Art Published:

A road to frustration

Aalto University theorist part of a team that opens up a new route to design exotic frustrated
quantum magnets.
Pohjoisen ikirouta-alueen vehreää kasvillisuutta. Kuva: Ive van Krunkelsven
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

Greenhouse gas emissions from permafrost area larger than earlier estimated

Plant roots in soil stimulate microbial decomposition, a mechanism called the priming effect. A recent study published in Nature Geoscience shows that the priming effect alone can cause emission of 40 billion tonnes carbon from permafrost by 2100.