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Antimatter met strategy in the installation lectures

The installation lectures by newly tenured professors at Aalto University were published online.

Filip Tuomisto spoke about material physics.  Photo Lasse Lecklin.

Aalto University celebrated its recently appointed Associate and Full level tenure track professors on 19 January by organising the traditional event in which the professors give a lecture on their own area of research and teaching.

The topics ranged from atomic-level defects in matter to large-scale solutions related to mitigation of climate change, and from sound system technology to strategic processes.

All lectures are now available on Aalto University’s YouTube channel.

Katja Hölttä-Otto: "Towards discipline-free product development"

Ville Pulkki: "Developing spatial sound techniques for human listeners"

Sanna Syri: "Efficient mitigation of climate change in national and international energy systems"

Mika Sillanpää: "The borderline between quantum physics and everyday world"

Filip Tuomisto: "Nuclear engineering, materials physics and antimatter"

Eero Vaara: "A discursive perspective on strategic processes and practices"

 

 

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