News

Addressing climate change will require radical changes in lifestyles: new report by international consortium of research institutes

1,5 degree lifestyles

If the world is to keep climate change at manageable levels before the middle of the century,changes in lifestyles are not only inevitable, but would need to be radical, and start immediately. Considering current consumption levels, citizens in many developed countries would have to cut their lifestyle carbon footprints by about 80-90% or more, and some in developing countries by about 30-80% within the next 30 years. This is one of the key messages coming from the report “1.5-Degree Lifestyles: Targets and options for reducing lifestyle carbon footprints,” just launched by a group of experts from an international consortium of research and policy institutes.

The Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Aalto University, D-mat, the Finnish Innovation Fund Sitra, and the KR Foundation, at the World Resources Forum (WRF), today announced the launch of a report which analyses the carbon footprints of household lifestyles and how changes can contribute to meeting the ambitious 1.5-degree aspirational target envisaged by the Paris Agreement on climate change. Findings in the publication make it clear that changes in consumption patterns and dominant lifestyles are a critical and integral part of the solutions package for addressing climate change. It analyses scientific emission scenarios and case studies from Finland, Japan, China, Brazil, and India, and proposes long-term targets for individuals’ lifestyle carbon footprints by 2030-2050, as well as low-carbon options that citizens and society can adopt.

The report provides a unique analysis of potential implications of the Paris Agreement from a lifestyle perspective, whereas most existing studies predominantly focus on production- and technology-based solutions. The publication establishes the first global per-capita lifestyle carbon footprint targets for 2030 to 2050 with explicit linkages to the 1.5-degree target. It also proposes an indicator of “lifestyle carbon footprint,” a consumption-based greenhouse gas accounting used for establishing targets, examining current status, and identifying solutions. Its comprehensive series of analyses focus on the climate impacts of household lifestyles and can be further expanded to countries beyond the selected case studies.

This news is from an external site. Read full article: here

  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

In Tension 4 Photo by_ Eeva Suorlahti
Research & Art, Studies Published:

Near futures online exhibition provides a view into future solutions

The socially impactful projects of the master's students who graduated in the academic year 2019–2020 are now on display in an online exhibition.
The photo shows the School of Business main staircase. The photo was taken by Unto Rautio.
Research & Art Published:

Academy of Finland corona-related funding to Assistant Professor Ewald Kibler’s research group

The group will study the effects of the COVID-19 crisis on entrepreneurs who are over 50 years old and for whom the crisis thus poses several risks.
Economicum-rakennus vaahterapuun katveessa
Cooperation, Research & Art Published:

Seventh report of the Helsinki GSE situation room: Largest drop in salary amount in April in Kouvola, Vaasa and Helsinki

The report is presented at an open access webinar in Zoom on Thursday, 4 June at 8 am.
A board room
Research & Art Published:

Should corporate boards be involved in the strategy of companies?

When company boards get involved in the management’s strategy, accountability can be compromised