News

A combination of wood fibres and spider silk could rival plastic

The unique material outperforms most of today’s synthetic and natural materials by providing high strength and stiffness, combined with increased toughness
Hämähäkkisilkki
Silk is a natural protein that can also be produced synthetically. It has good abilities and versatile possibilities. Photo: Eeva Suorlahti

Achieving strength and extensibility at the same time has so far been a great challenge in material engineering: increasing strength has meant losing extensibility and vice versa. Now Aalto University and VTT researchers have succeeded in overcoming this challenge, with inspiration from nature.

The researchers created a truly new bio-based material by gluing together wood cellulose fibres and the silk protein found in spider web threads. The result is a very firm and resilient material which could be used in the future as a possible replacement for plastic, as part of bio-based composites and in medical applications, surgical fibres, the textile industry and packaging.

According to Aalto University Professor Markus Linder, nature offers great ingredients for developing new materials, such as firm and easily available cellulose and tough and flexible silk as used in this research. The advantage with both of these materials is that, unlike plastic, they are biodegradable and do not damage nature the same way micro-plastics do.

‘Our researchers just need to be able to reproduce the natural properties’, adds Linder, who was also leading the research.

‘We used birch tree pulp, broke it down to cellulose nanofibrils and aligned them into a stiff scaffold. At the same time, we infiltrated the cellulosic network with a soft and energy dissipating spider silk adhesive matrix,’ says Research Scientist Pezhman Mohammadi from VTT.

Silk is a natural protein which is excreted by animals like silkworms and also found in spider web threads. The spider web silk used by Aalto University researchers, however, is not actually taken from spider webs but is instead produced by the researchers using bacteria with synthetic DNA.

‘Because we know the structure of the DNA, we can copy it and use this to manufacture silk protein molecules which are chemically similar to those found in spider web threads. The DNA has all this information contained in it’, Linder explains.

‘Our work illustrates the new and versatile possibilities for protein engineering. In the future, we could manufacture similar composites with slightly different building blocks and achieve a different set of characteristics for other applications. Currently, we are working on making new composite materials as implants, impact resistance objects and other products,” says Pezhman.

The research project is part of the work of the Centre of Excellence in Molecular Engineering of Biosynthetic Hybrid Materials (HYBER). 

The research was published in Science Advances 13 September. Link to the article (Science Advances)

More information:

Markus Linder
Professor, Aalto University
+358 50 431 5525
[email protected] 

Pezhman Mohammadi
Research Scientist, VTT
+358 40 163 7835
[email protected]

Christopher Landowski
Research Team Leader, VTT
+358 40 482 0856
[email protected]

Read more

Kuva osoittaa, miten valmistetaan biosynteettistä hämähäkinseittiä suurjännitteen avulla

Spider silk is created by adding spider DNA to microbes

Researchers studying spiders have produced a synthetic biomaterial that can, in future, be used to make a multitude of products from clothes to car parts.

News
  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Related news

Otaniemi campus above / photo: Aalto University, Matti Ahlgren
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

More than 300 corporate executives reported on the effects of the coronavirus crisis: decelerated expansion plans, accelerated innovation activities, and increasing demand for talent

Companies were generally effective in their operative crisis management, but obstacles remain in the way of long-term growth, according to a new study by Aalto University. The researchers say that availability of know-how, especially in relation to new technologies, is becoming a bottleneck for organizational growth and renewal.
Aalto Töölön juhlasali
Campus, Press releases Published:

The renovation of the Aalto University Töölö building restored the spirit of the 1950s

The former main building of the School of Business in Runeberginkatu was renewed into a modern learning environment.
With the right guidance, certain bacteria can produce 3D objects made of nanocellulose
Press releases, Research & Art Published:

Scientists use bacteria as micro-3D printers

Technique creates highly customised structures that could be used in regenerative medicine
Amsterdamin konserttisali
Press releases Published:

Can you identify which concert hall this music is being played in? Test to see

Study shows music volume has a major impact on how the listener experiences the acoustics of a concert hall