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Atomic structure of metal-halide perovskites from first principles: The chicken-and-egg paradox of the organic-inorganic interaction

Jingrui's paper about the atomic structure of hybrid perovskites for photovoltaic applications just appeared as Physical Review B 94, 045201 (2016)

Our paper "Atomic structure of metal-halide perovskites from first principles: The chicken-and-egg paradox of the organic-inorganic interaction" is now available in Physical Review B (http://journals.aps.org/prb/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevB.94.045201). We use density-functional theory to study the atomic structure of several hybrid perovskite materials. We identify two stable structures and analyse them in terms of organic-inorganic and van der Waals interactions. The stable structures result from a delicate interplay between the position of the organic cation and the deformation of the inorganic framework like in the chicken-and-egg paradox.

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