News

Ultrasound provides medical needles new functions - can be used to deliver genes

Emanuele Perra’s doctoral research will look at how nonlinear ultrasound can be used to create vibrations in an ordinary medical needle. He will defend his doctoral thesis on 7 October
The ultrasonic needle, which is a regular medical needle with a metal attachement connected to a large box on the side of the syringe
Photo: Aalto University.

The technology of medical needles has not changed dramatically in 150 years. In his doctoral research, Emanuele Perra explored if nonlinear ultrasound can be used to overcome the limitations of currently used medical needles, such as the pain experienced by patients, inaccuracy and variable quality of needle biopsy samples. The study follows on from previous research into the use of ultrasound.

‘In this study, we used needles to generate transverse-like motions at 30 kHz. This allows the acoustic energy to be amplified towards the needle tip, exactly where the effect is needed. This localised ultrasound energy can be used in a variety of applications, such as improving the quality of needle biopsy samples,’ says Professor Heikki Nieminen, who is leading the project.

Using computer models and experimental studies, the researchers were able to show that oscillations of the needle caused a number of non-linear acoustic phenomena. These include cavitation, the sudden expansion and collapse of air bubbles; the formation of acoustically driven fluid flows; acoustic radiation force, the force exerted by an ultrasonic wave on an object; and the formation of micro-droplets.

‘The investigated approach has the potential to give conventional medical needles new enhanced functions in medical applications not only in needle biopsy but also in drug or gene delivery, cell stimulation, and minimally invasive surgical procedures’, says Nieminen.

Contact information:

Read more:

The ultrasonic needle, which is a regular medical needle with a metal attachement connected to a large box on the side of the syringe

21st century medical needles for high-tech cancer diagnostics

Modern medicine needs better quality samples than traditional biopsy needles can provide, ultrasonically oscillating needles can improve treatment and reduce discomfort

News
  • Published:
  • Updated:
Share
URL copied!

Read more news

TFiF-kandityön palkinnon voittaneet opiskelijat.
Honoured, Studies Published:

Three Aalto students were awarded for the best bachelor's thesis in Swedish in the field of technology

TFiF's awards went to Linda Autio, Isak Jungerstam and Fanny Hakala.
Opiskelijat tutkimassa aurinkopaneelia.
Press releases, Studies Published:
Students studying in a study room. Photo by Unto Rautio.
Studies Published:

International Student Barometer: feedback collected from international students in November-December

International students at Aalto can respond to the International Student Barometer (ISB) survey during 24.11.-19.12.2022.
Mikko Jääskeläinen
Cooperation, Studies Published:

Alumnus Mikko Jääskeläinen: Studying at the School of Business has opened many professional doors

Our alumnus Mikko Jääskeläinen, who majored in Creative Sustainability and also studied finance, ended up working in management consulting after graduation. While in that position, he became fascinated by transport and real estate infrastructure projects, which led him to a job involving urban economy and land use general planning for the City of Helsinki, and from there, a position at the Ministry of Transport and Communications. The best parts of his job are the interesting tasks and his knowledgeable colleagues.