Defence in the field of service operations, An Chen, M.Sc.(Tech.)

2017-12-15 12:00:00 2017-12-15 23:59:27 Europe/Helsinki Defence in the field of service operations, An Chen, M.Sc.(Tech.) The title of the dissertation is: Understanding Patient Choice: A Study of Women’s Choice in Prenatal Screening and Testing http://www.aalto.fi/en/midcom-permalink-1e7a98c87c77b2aa98c11e795fbe190e74245224522 Maarintie 8, 02150, Espoo

The title of the dissertation is: Understanding Patient Choice: A Study of Women’s Choice in Prenatal Screening and Testing

15.12.2017 / 12:00
Aalto University, lecture hall AS1, Maarintie 8, 02150, Espoo, FI

An Chen, M.Sc.(Tech.) will defend the dissertation "Understanding Patient Choice: A Study of Women’s Choice in Prenatal Screening and Testing" on 15 December 2017 at 12 noon at the Aalto University School of Science, lecture hall AS1, Maarintie 8, Espoo. This dissertation advances the understanding on patient choice and choice-making, and provides an insight into how to systematically construct possible choice architectures and design appropriate choice aids.

In modern healthcare patients are endowed with increased opportunities to choose and decide according to their own preferences. However, patient choice comes with controversy and complexity. Choice and choice situations need to be managed. To this end more knowledge is needed about how people choose and what affects their choices. The overall aim of the dissertation is to advance the understanding of patient choice, explore the choice-making process from a patient perspective, and provide possible solutions to optimize patient choice and improve choice satisfaction. This dissertation takes a pragmatic view and apply a mixed-method case study approach. The study focuses on women’s choice and choice-making in prenatal screening and testing within the public maternal service system implemented in the District of Helsinki and Uusimaa (HUS) in Finland. This study found that contextual factors were important for patients to make choices, and patients had different choice-making processes at different contexts. This study also developed a set of measurements to quantify and evaluate patient experience in choice-making processes and identified experiential factors that significantly influence patient satisfaction with the choices the patient made. This study provides an insight into how to systematically construct possible choice architectures and design appropriate choice aids. Especially, it highlights the role of context in organizing health services and studying patient choices. It also contributes to the practices of communicating with patients who are suffered from unexpected situations and assisting them in arriving at a satisfying choice.

Dissertation release (pdf)

Opponent: Associate Professor Louise Bryant, University of Leeds, UK

Custos: Professor Paul Lillrank, Aalto University School of Science, Department of Industrial Engineering and Management

Electronic dissertation: http://urn.fi/URN:ISBN:978-952-60-7691-1